November, 2017

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Wildlife Photography Workshop

We held our very first Wildlife Photography Workshop at Karreekloof from the 8th to the 12th of November 2017.  We had great times and everyone enjoyed learning and practicing their skills under that guidance of our Professional Photographer.

The Workshop

All novices and semi-professional photographers were welcome.  The participants had an opportunity to relax and enjoy nature, whilst enhancing their photography skills.  The workshop focused on practical experience and shooting – lots of shooting.   It also focused on specialized topics such as different lens, composition & motion techniques, depth of field etc. In addition, come learn about Adobe “Creative Cloud” Light Room vs Photoshop, back-up and photo management and much more. We all worked closely together, sharing knowledge and experience.   We also got the chance to learn more about Milky Way Photography under the guidance of our Professional photographer.

Here are some of the photos that were taken.

  • Karrekloof Pics-8381
    Karrekloof Pics-8357
    Karrekloof Pics-6973
    Karrekloof Pics-6937

  • Karrekloof Pics-6933
    Karrekloof Pics-6903
    Karrekloof Pics-6883
    Karrekloof Pics-6843
  • Karrekloof Pics-6587
    Karrekloof Pics-6626
    Karrekloof Pics-6668
    Karrekloof Pics-6677
  • Karrekloof Pics-6715
    Karrekloof Pics-6730
    Karrekloof Pics-6762
    Karrekloof Pics-6838
  • Karrekloof Pics-6572
    Karrekloof Pics-6528

Hunting Spiral-Horned Antelope Part 2

Spiral horned antelope are elusive antelope characterized by outrageously impressive spiraled horns in the males, and lovely camouflaged patterns in the females.  Previously, we looked at the impressive Kudu and Eland.  If you’ve missed our first article about Hunting Spiral-Horned Antelope Part 1, you are more than welcome to read it.  Only the males have horns, except in the case of eland where both sexes are horned. The most common species of the spiral-horned antelope found in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa are Kudu, Eland, Nyala and Bushbuck.    Here follows a couple of tips on hunting Nyala and Bushbuck:

Nyala

The Nyala and Bushbuck are very closely related. They are water dependent and therefore have to drink daily. They tend to graze during the cool hours and even at night, resting during the heat of the day. The techniques used for hunting Nyala associates closely with the techniques used for hunting kudu.  An ambush when the antelope approached the feeding areas and water holes, can be recommended. If tracked and pushed hard, like most antelope, it will become curious and stop to look back at his pursuer. This gives you an opportunity to take the shot.  Rifles of less than .270 cannot be recommended. The .270 and a good shot placement will certainly get the job done. The various 30 calibers, would be an even better choice.

Bushbuck

The bushbuck is the smallest member of the spiral-horned antelope. It is primarily a browser and feeds during the night or early morning and late afternoon on leaves, grass, branches, flowers and fruit.

Still-hunting can be very productive, or one might try moving quietly through the bush, probing the dense cover, always being aware of the wind direction. It is recommended that you hunt the bushbuck with a 7x57mm, or a 30 caliber rifle. You will probably be shooting through thick cover. Shot placement is extremely important. Place your shot so as to penetrate and pass through the chest cavity. You do not want to wound it because, for his size, it can be extremely dangerous. A wounded or cornered bushbuck is apt to be very aggressive and will not hesitate to charge. If your wounded bushbuck escapes to dense cover, which he will certainly try to do, be very cautious in your pursuit.

The elegant spiral-horned antelope make for beautiful trophies and is definitely a must for all hunters that come to hunt in Africa.

Hunting Spiral-Horned Antelope Part 1

Spiral-horned antelope are large and elusive antelope characterized by outrageously impressive spiralled horns in the males and lovely camouflaged patterns in the females. Only the males have horns, except in the case of Eland where both sexes are horned. The most common species of the spiral-horned antelope found in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa are Kudu, Eland, Nyala and Bushbuck.   The spiral in the horns is a result of a growth pulse.  At certain times, the horn material will grow faster and thinner and at other times thicker and slower, resulting in spiral horns.  Here follows a couple of tips on hunting these magnificent species:

Kudu

The kudu tends to browse in the early morning and late afternoon. It usually rests during the heat of the day. Hunting kudu can be extremely challenging. It is very sly and extremely elusive with exceptional senses. It will be easiest to look for spoor around water holes as they drink regularly and will never be too far from water. There are several methods that can be used when hunting kudu.  One must check likely feeding areas in the early morning hours, and stalk.

It also recommended that one ambush the kudu’s likely feeding areas at daybreak as the bulls return to higher ground and cover.  At midday, you can lie in wait by the water, as they are regular drinkers. In addition to these techniques, consider tracking if the ground permits, or try still-hunting in thick cover. Hunting kudu with less than 7mm or .270 caliber rifles would not be recommended.

Eland

The Cape Eland is southern Africa’s largest antelope, and also the largest spiral-horned antelope. Eland tends to be nervous, taking flight at the first sign of danger.  This could make hunting extremely difficult, as they are difficult to approach and to therefore get within shooting range.  Hunting Eland with the right rifle is also of paramount importance. Many Eland are taken with lesser rifles, but the .375 would not be considered overkill! A well-placed shot are very important.  A few inches to the left or right with a lesser caliber may make for a long day of tracking or even the loss of a wounded animal. The easiest way to hunt eland is by chance encounter while hunting other game. Ensure that you have a quick follow-up shot, as he will not go down easily.

To be continued… see part 2