Hunting Safari

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Sable

The Sable is one of the most popular trophies that can be taken on a hunting safari in South Africa. Here follows a couple of interesting facts and features about the majestic Sable:

 

Appearance

The Sable is a large and handsome antelope. Sable bulls are characterized by shiny black coats with white underparts and white facial markings. Cows and young are dark brown/reddish brown in colour. Both bulls and cows have long horns, which are ridged, and which curve backwards. The horns of the sable bull are exceptional and the longest of any African antelope, excepting the kudu.

 

Diet

Sable are grazers which crop grass at a relatively high level off the ground. Their diet consists predominantly of grass.

 

Breeding

The gestation period of sable are 270 days, after which they give birth to single calves.

 

Habitat

They prefer open savannah woodlands, in which they select for medium height, good quality grass cover. They normally live in herds of up to 30, but larger herds are not uncommon. Sable bulls can be very territorial and the challenging interloper is in for a serious encounter if he does not retreat. Combat is usually done kneeling with rapid sweeps of their sharp and powerful horns, which can sometimes result in death.

 

Hunting

Sable are most active during early mornings and late afternoons and drink water at mid-day. Ambush them at drinking places. Do not be under gunned when hunting Sable. Just like the Roan, the .300 caliber and up is your best choice. When you are faced with a side-on view, the high heart/lung shot directed straight up the foreleg about one third into the body is required. Because of the size and aggressive nature of this beautiful antelope, hunting sable can be an interesting endeavour. Be sure to use enough gun, shoot straight and this coveted trophy will be yours! The sable can be very aggressive and will not hesitate to charge if wounded, cornered, or simply feels threatened.

Bow Hunting

Wintershoek Safaris has been in the bow hunting industry since 1982, and we have worked endlessly since then to maintain our flawless reputation. Linksfontein, our bow hunting area, has more than 20 fixed blinds that have been set up and designed using years of experience.

Bow hunting is good all year round, but the best time is May through to October. The reason for this is that those are our dry months, which means food and water are hard to come by and the animals are more concentrated. The animals, therefore, have to come into known feeding areas for water and food. On a good day, a hunter can expect to bag up to 2-3 different species out of a blind. Shots will vary from 15 to 35 yards.

Bow hunting in South Africa is most definitely one of the most challenging methods to hunt. It will test all your skills, concentration and patience. Our bow hunts are mostly done out of blinds but you are of course also welcome to test your skills trying to walk & stalk. All scent lock, camo, and bowhunting accessories are beneficial.

Our areas also allow for a combination of bow and rifle hunting without having any negative influence on the blinds and bowhunting success. This allows for friends with interest in both to visit us at one time or it allows you to try your hand at both which normally makes for a great experience.

A bow hunting safari should normally be longer than a rifle hunting safari.  The reason being that it takes more time and persistence to get your preferred species.  If you are a bow hunting enthusiast wanting to come to South Africa to hunt truly magnificent animals, do not wait too long!

Being under the African sky, feeling the sun on your face and the smell of veld might just be one of the best and most memorable things to experience and remember

Plains game species that can be hunted in South Africa – Part 4

Here follows the last couple of Plains Game Species that can be hunted in South Africa:

TSESSEBE

Tsessebe have the distinction of being the fastest antelope in Africa. They are part of the same family as the wildebeest and hartebeest. All of which have a strange appearance due to the fact that their shoulders are higher than their hindquarters. It is recommended that tsessebe is hunted with a .30 caliber rifle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WATERBUCK

Waterbuck can be identified by the distinct white circle around their tails. As the name implies, these large antelope are never found far from a permanent water source.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WARTHOG

Warthog are widespread throughout South Africa. This common wild pig’s trophy size is typically assessed by its upper tusks, but often also hunted for its rather delicious meat. Warthog are often found around waterholes and pans and like to inhabit the desert dens of anteaters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZEBRA – BURCHELL’S

The Burchell’s or plains zebra is the most common zebra in Southern Africa. Revered for their spectacular skins, zebra are typically found on open plains and grassland areas. Zebra are highly dependent upon water and will never stray too far from a water source.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZEBRA – MOUNTAIN

The Cape mountain zebra is slightly smaller than the Burchell’s and lacks the distinctive shadow stripe than the Burchell’s has. Its underbelly is also completely white.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To some, plains game hunting in Southern Africa has remained only a dream, as most perceive it as far too expensive and best left to only the wealthiest of hunters. This can not be further from the truth. In fact, you can book a very enjoyable plains game hunting safari in South Africa for considerably less than the average elk hunt in the western states of America.

African plains game hunting is conducted in a variety of geographical areas which can vary widely in climate, vegetation, and topography. The hunting areas can range from densely wooded savanna to wide open grasslands.

Plains game species that can be hunted in South Africa – Part 3

Here follows the next couple of plains game species that can be hunted in South Africa:

NYALA

Nyala are among the most graceful of the spiral-horned antelope that can be hunted in South Africa. Their preferred habitat is the higher rainfall eastern parts of South Africa where they favour densely wooded savanna. The .270 should be the smallest caliber with which to pursue the Nyala. A .30 caliber rifle would, however, be a better choice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RED HARTEBEEST

The awkward-looking red hartebeest is one of the fastest of the plains game animals found in South Africa. They favour open-country areas where they rely on their speed to elude predators. Hartebeest have good hearing and an acute sense of smell and should always be approached slowly from downwind. Their eyesight is not particularly good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROAN

The number of roan antelope in South Africa has increased substantially over the last decade.  They are the second largest of the plains game animals that can be hunted on a South African hunting safari.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OSTRICH

The world’s largest living bird species also counts among the other species that can be hunted whilst on safari in South Africa. The ostrich is popular for the high quality of its hide, its magnificent feathers, and its lean, high-protein meat. Ostriches are also often hunted while in pursuit of other game.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SABLE

Sable antelope are most active during the early mornings and late afternoons. Their distinctive colouring makes them easy to spot, even in the densest vegetation. The scimitar-shaped horns of the sable are probably the most prized of all the plains game trophies found in South Africa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRINGBOK – BLACK

The black springbok is not a sub-species, but rather a colour variation on the common springbok. They occur in all areas where the common springbok is found. Black springbok trophies make a great display when mounted alongside the common, white and copper springbok.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRINGBOK – COMMON

The common springbok is the national animal of South Africa. These graceful animals are hunted on open terrain where their exceptional eyesight make it very difficult to get within shooting range. They are best hunted with a caliber with a high velocity and a very flat trajectory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRINGBOK – WHITE

The white springbok is another colour variation on the common springbok which can be hunted in South Africa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEENBOK

Steenbok are a fairly common small antelope that have a wide distribution in South Africa. Steenbok are territorial antelope and only the male of the species carries horns. They would normally be taken on a chance encounter while hunting for another animal.