Zebra – Hartmann

Latin = Equus zebra, Afrikaans = Kaapse bergsebra, Tswana = Pitsi)

  • Numbers: Very low
  • Weight: 204 – 260 kg (449 – 572 lb.)
  • Shoulder height: 124 – 127 cm (50 – 51 in.)
  • Pregnancy time: 365 days
  • Calf quantity : 1


The Cape Mountain Zebra is the smallest of the zebra species. Since the stripes on the body are narrower than those on the Burchell’s zebra, there are more. The horizontal stripes on the legs extend right down to the hooves. Hindquarters are covered with broad black stripes, and a gridiron pattern of narrow, transverse dark markings appear on the rump. The bellies are white and devoid of any stripes.


Predominantly a grazer, feeding in areas with short grass. Zebra have a strong sensitive upper lip with which it gathers herbage by collecting the grass between the lip and the lower incisors before plucking the harvest.


Non-seasonal breeder, foals may be born in any month. However, under optimal conditions more foals are born during summer. After a gestation period of 360-390 days, a single foal is born.


Hunting mountain zebra with less than the .270 Win cannot be recommended. This tough little striped member of the equine family is better taken with the 30 calibers or even larger. Don’t be afraid of being over-gunned; a badly placed shot from a light rifle will make for an extremely long day of tracking. Remember, no matter what rifle you choose, shot placement is always most important. The high heart/lung shot will be your best bet when hunting mountain zebra. Aim your shot directly up the front leg between one third and half way into the body; be careful not to shoot above the midline. Further forward and a bit higher on the shoulder blade will give you a spinal/neck shot and your zebra will drop in his tracks. If offered the frontal profile while hunting Zebra, place your shot dead center in the chest, right between the shoulders at the base of the neck.